Jewish Women in Fin de Siecle Vienna (Jewish History, Life by Alison Rose

By Alison Rose

Regardless of a lot examine of Viennese tradition and Judaism among 1890 and 1914, little learn has been performed to check the function of Jewish ladies during this milieu. Rescuing a misplaced legacy, Jewish ladies in Fin de Si?cle Vienna explores the myriad ways that Jewish girls contributed to the improvement of Viennese tradition and took part largely in politics and cultural spheres. parts of exploration contain the schooling and family members lives of Viennese Jewish women and ranging levels of involvement of Jewish ladies in philanthropy and prayer, collage lifestyles, Zionism, psychoanalysis and drugs, literature, and tradition. Incorporating common reports of Austrian girls in this interval, Alison Rose additionally provides major findings relating to stereotypes of Jewish gender and sexuality and the politics of anti-Semitism, in addition to the impression of German tradition, feminist dialogues, and bourgeois self-images. As individuals of 2 minority teams, Viennese Jewish ladies still used their involvement in numerous activities to come back to phrases with their twin identification in this interval of profound social turmoil. Breaking new floor within the learn of perceptions and realities inside a pivotal phase of the Viennese inhabitants, Jewish ladies in Fin de Si?cle Vienna applies the lens of gender in vital new methods.

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Children in assimilated families sometimes developed a sense of curiosity about the religion that their family had struggled to leave behind. For example, Toni Bondy Cassirer (1883–1961), wife of philosopher Ernst Cassirer, wrote about her family’s distance from Judaism and her opposing stance. “We were raised without religion. My father’s family had not observed the rituals for three generations, and my father was so far removed from the ghetto type, that he quite seriously believed in assimilation and also wished for it.

27 Discrimination in Schools While many did eventually attend Lyzeen with high percentages of Jewish girls, this was not always the case. Furthermore, in the Volksschulen (public elementary schools), many educated Viennese women remember having felt alienated from Judaism. In part this alienation seems to have stemmed from their experiences of the “religion lesson” at school during which they received separate instruction in Judaism. While Jewish boys also had the experience of being separated for religious instruction, girls also sometimes felt alienated in a tradition which seemed to hold them in lower esteem.

80 The students practiced speaking loudly and clearly and pronouncing the Hebrew words properly. The lessons were open to students even if they did not intend to participate in a confirmation ceremony. The notions expressed by the Viennese lay leadership in these documents demonstrate a shift in Jewish practice and identity. They aimed to create a feeling of community in Jewish girls, which would be carried over into their future homes. An exchange on the subject of girls’ confirmations in the Viennese Jewish newspaper, Die Wahrheit, in 1913 suggests that the debate continued.

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